Thursday, April 3, 2008

Rediculous

Check this out. Kathleen Seidel who uses her blog, at http://neurodiversity.com to support rights for folks on the autism spectrum and bad mouth crackpots who say wacky things (including things like, "autism is caused by vaccination). One particular set of crackpots who are suing a pharmaceutical company or the government or whatever, are trying to subpoena everything in her life vaguely associated with her broad rambling blog. She's not involved in the case in any way, and this is just an attempt to intimidate a vocal critic.

If the judge allows the subpoena, then no one will be able to blog freely on any subject. We will all be afraid that everything from our tax returns to our church attendance will be on trial if someone launches a civil action that has some connection to the topic we are discussing.

This story has also been picked up by Overlawyered.com. I do so hope that the judge is as offended as he should be and that there is some sort of sanction for this outlandish behavior.

4 comments:

Marla said...

Wow. I can't see that working out for them so well. Any judge would be like, "So? And this has to do with your case how?" At least I would hope so!

Marty D. said...

Streisand effect!

Liz Ditz said...

You may find Seidel's two latest posts of interest.


Billing the Adversary


Numerous decisions issued over the twenty year history of the Vaccine Injury Compensation Program (VICP) document the extent to which the limits on attorney compensation have been tested by practitioners seeking remuneration from its taxpayer-financed coffers. The following review summarizes decisions involving the recently-sanctioned VICP specialist Clifford Shoemaker, Esq. -- a central instigator of the campaign to convince the public of the speculative, scientifically unsupported hypothesis that a significant number of cases of autism result from vaccine injury, co-founder of the Institute for Chronic Illnesses, and a founding member its Institutional Review Board, which sponsors and provides ethical oversight of medical research and experimentation on autistic children and adolescents conducted by his long-time colleague Dr. Mark Geier.


Inspecting the Outstretched Palm

The potential for procedural and billing improprieties by Vaccine Injury Compensation Program petitioners’ attorneys — especially those representing numerous clients with similar, speculative claims — is made painfully evident in Special Master Denise Vowell’s recent fee and cost decision in Carrington v. HHS, Case 99-495V (Fed.Cl.Spec.Mstr., June 18, 2008) (unpublished), posted to the U.S. Court of Federal Claims website three days ago.

Numerous decisions issued over the twenty year history of the Vaccine Injury Compensation Program (VICP) document the extent to which the limits on attorney compensation have been tested by practitioners seeking remuneration from its taxpayer-financed coffers. The following review summarizes decisions involving the recently-sanctioned VICP specialist Clifford Shoemaker, Esq. -- a central instigator of the campaign to convince the public of the speculative, scientifically unsupported hypothesis that a significant number of cases of autism result from vaccine injury, co-founder of the Institute for Chronic Illnesses, and a founding member its Institutional Review Board, which sponsors and provides ethical oversight of medical research and experimentation on autistic children and adolescents conducted by his long-time colleague Dr. Mark Geier.

Joshua said...
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